Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) cost in Czechia

The X-ray imaging of blood flow in the body is known as angiography. During an angiography, X-ray-opaque chemicals are injected into the bloodstream. The path they take through blood arteries can be used to diagnose problems. Angiography is used to find blockages in the lungs, heart, brain, and other smaller blood arteries (called microangiography). It could also be used to locate internal bleeding (haemorrhage) and aneurysms (abnormal dilatation of blood vessels), both of which can cause serious health problems.

Prague is the most popular medical tourism destination because it has the greatest surgeons who take excellent care of its growing number of medical tourists. Medical advancements have resulted in a surge in demand for medical treatments in European countries. Prague is the most popular medical tourism destination because it has the greatest surgeons who take excellent care of its growing number of medical tourists. Medical advancements have resulted in a surge in demand for medical treatments in European countries. When it comes to specialties, Prague offers a large number of experts in the fields of cardiac and cosmetic surgery. In Prague, angiography is done with skill, excellence and authenticity. They become more aware of the importance of caring for international patients. Prague makes medical tourism of the patients easy and complete with no waiting time, reputable, skilled, and English-speaking staff.

Top-Hospitals in Prague for Angiography are Czech Medical Center, Motol University Hospital, etc.

Cost Comparison

The cost of angiography in Prague ranges from $800 to $1000. The amount of people travelling and the length of days you'll be in and out of the hospital will determine the cost. In comparison to other nations such as the United States, Spain, Australia, and the United Kingdom, Prague costs 30% less.

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About the Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast)

Most physicians advise their patients to undergo the angiogram procedure (also known as angiography and arteriogram) when certain symptoms such as a heart attack or chest pain become a source of worry. A stress test is performed on patients who report chest pain, which is then followed by an angiogram test.

Angiography procedure aims at testing the blockages in the coronary arteries apart from any other cardiovascular-related ailments. Angiography and angiogram procedure can both locate narrowing arteries or blockages that may exist in different parts of the body.

Angiography is recommended for patients with coronary heart diseases (CHD), which can cause the heartbeat to stop suddenly and abruptly. The patient may also suffer from severe chest pain. Angiography can also be performed on patients on an emergency basis when they experience a heart attack. If the blockage is not treated immediately, then healthy tissues around the heart start perishing and turn into scar tissue. It can give rise to several long-lasting problems. Angiography may also be required in the case of a patient with aortic stenosis or those who have had an abnormal heart stress test.

How is Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) performed?

The procedure involves administering a sedative for relaxation. An intravenous line is inserted into the vein. This is just a precautionary step to ensure that medication can be provided or blood products can be given in case of unwanted complications that take place during the angiography procedure.

  • An antiseptic agent is used to clean the location and a local anesthetic is then administered. For the passage of the needle, a small incision is made. Something named as a stylet, which is a needle with a solid inner core, is inserted into the artery via the incision. After the puncture of the artery, the radiologist replaces the stylet with a guide wire, which is a long wire. Spurting of blood is normal during the process. Through the outer needle, the guide wire is fed into the artery that is supposed to be studied. To direct the guide wire to the correct location of the artery, a fluoroscope display is used. Once the location is spotted, the needle is removed and a catheter is placed over the guide wire’s length until it reaches the region of the study. The guide wire is then removed and now a contrast medium is injected in the region.
  • The contrast medium can be injected either through a syringe or an automatic injector referred to as power injector. Before this, a small test injection is given to check that the catheter is in the right position. The patient is informed to stay as still as possible during this process. The injection can cause a little bit of dizziness, warmth, burning sensation, chest pain, irregular heartbeat, or a headache. The patient is often asked to change position to allow the study from different perspectives.
  • Throughout the procedure, radiographs or fluoroscopic images are obtained in rapid succession. Because of the high pressure of the blood flow in the artery, the contrasting medium gets diluted and starts dissipating in the body. More than one automatic film changers is employed to capture the images.
  • Digital image capture makes it possible to manipulate the information electronically. This is known as digital subtraction angiography or DSA. Computers make use of pixels to analyze the information better. After the completion of the X-Ray, the catheter is slowly removed and manual pressure is applied to the site for about 10 to 20 minutes with a sandbag. This allows resealing of the arterial puncture. A pressure bandage is then applied at this site.

Recovery from Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast)

The patient is kept under close observation for at least 6 to 12 hours if the procedure is performed on an outpatient basis. In case of a femoral artery puncture, the leg is almost kept immobile during the observation period.

Blood pressure and other vital signs are continuously monitored. A cold pack is applied to reduce swelling in the area of puncture and medications are given in case of extreme discomfort.

Hematoma may develop in a few patients. This indicates continuous bleeding from the puncture site and has to be watched for. Two to three days of complete rest is advised and driving should be avoided in the case of patients who have had fluorescein angiography. Direct exposure to sunlight should be avoided for at least 12 hours.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What are the factors affecting the cost of Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Czechia?

Different hospitals have different pricing policy when it comes to the cost of Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Czechia. The Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) package cost usually includes all the expenses related to pre and post surgery expenses of the patient. The comprehensive Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) package cost includes the cost of investigations, surgery, medicines and consumables. A prolonged hospital stay due to delayed recovery, new diagnosis and complications after surgery may increase the cost of Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Czechia.

Which are some of the best hospitals in Czechia for Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast)t?

There are many hospitals across the country that offer Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) to international patients. The top hospitals for Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Czechia include the following:

  1. Czech Medical Center
How many days does it take to recover post Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Czechia?

Upon discharge from the hospital after Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Czechia, the patients are advised to stay for about 3 days for recovery. During this time, the patient undergoes medical tests and consultations. this is to ensure that the treatment was successful and the patient us safe to return.

Which are some of the other popular destinations for Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast)?

Czechia is one of the most popular countries for Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in the world. The country offers the best cost of Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast), best doctors, and advanced hospital infrastructure. However, there are other countries as mentioned below that are popular for Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) as well:

CountryCost
IndiaUSD 350
IsraelUSD 2000
MalaysiaUSD 2000
PolandUSD 1500
Saudi ArabiaUSD 8500
SingaporeUSD 4400
ThailandUSD 1800
TunisiaUSD 1800
TurkeyUSD 1000
United Arab EmiratesUSD 2750
How much are the other expenses in Czechia apart from the cost of Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast)?

There are certain expenses additional to the Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) cost that the patient may have to pay for. These are the chanrges for daily meals and hotel stay outside the hospital. The per day cost in this case may start from USD 50 per person.

Which are the best cities in Czechia for Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) Procedure?

Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Czechia is offered in almost all metropolitan cities, including the following:

  1. Brno
  2. Prague
  3. Praha
How many days does one have to spend in the hospital for Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Czechia?

The average duration of stay at the hospital after Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) is about 1 days for proper care and monitoring. The patient is subjected to several biochemistry and radiological scans to see that everything is okay and the recovery is on track. After making sure that patient is clinically stable, discharge is planned.

How many hospitals offer Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Czechia?

There are more than 1 hospitals that offer Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Czechia. These clinics have propoer infrastructure as well as offer good quality of services when it comes to Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) These hospitals comply with all the rules and regulations as dictated by the regulatory bodies and medical association in Czechia

FAQ's Related to Czechia

What healthcare accreditation standards are followed in Czechia?

With a presence in over 100 countries, Joint Commission International accredites hospitals and clinics in Czechia as well. A not for profit entity, JCI or Joint Commission International maintains the patient safety and healthcare standards for the various healthcare entities in Czechia. There are numerous healthcare organisations in Czechia that bear the approval from Joint Commission International for their quality maintenance. The focus on getting certified from Joint Commission International shows the intention of a hospital or clinic in Czechia in improving upon organisation management and quality care for patients.

Which are the popular multispecialty hospital groups in Czechia?

We are listing here the popular multispecialty hospitals in Czechia for your convenience::

  1. The University Hospital , Brno
  2. Malvazinky Hospital, Praha
  3. Motol University Hospital, Prague
  4. St. Zdislav’s Hospital, Velke Mezirici
  5. Bulovka University Hospital, Prague
  6. Charles University Hospital, Pilsen
  7. General Hospital, Jablonec nad Nisou
  8. Canadian Medical, Prague
  9. Teaching Hospital Královské Vinohrady, Prague
  10. Na Homolce Hospital, Prague
  11. St. Annes Hospital, Pekarska, Brno
  12. Šternberk Hospital, Sternberk
  13. Nymburk Hospital, Nymburk
  14. Kolin Hospital, Kolin
  15. Liberec Regional Hospital, Liberec

The many advanced multispecialty hospitals in Czechia are the main reason behind its popularity as a sought after medical tourism destination. If you are coming to Czechia to get your treatment across different specialties, you can do so without worries as you can get the treatment you want in any multispecialty hospital in Czechia. The Czechia multispecialty hospitals’ are equipped with the latest technologies which are upgraded regularly so that the healthcare is equivalent to the best anywhere in the world.

Why should I opt for healthcare in Czechia?

You should opt for healthcare in Czechia because the healthcare systems in Czechia are based on a stringent framework which gives it a lot of credence among all entities be it patients, healthcare professionals, accreditation bodies, private organisations, academicians and governments. It is natural for any medical traveller to opt for healthcare in Czechia hospitals and clinics because there is a variety of treatments being performed here everyday at affordable costs. It is natural for any medical traveller to opt for healthcare in Czechia hospitals and clinics because there is a variety of treatments being performed here everyday at affordable costs. A strong reason to opt for healthcare in Czechia is the good health insurance coverage that covers Czech citizens, permanent residents, foreigners working for a local company, EU citizens through European Health Insurance Card (EHIC), Global Health Insurance card (GHIC) for UK citizens. Even those who are not covered by any of these options can opt for travel health insurance (less than 90 days stay) and private healthcare insurance schemes (for those staying for over 90 days).

What is the quality of doctors in Czechia?

With several decades of experience, on field training in their area of expertise and an education from the most reputed universities in the world, the doctors in Czechia are definitely of good quality. In order to ensure that the patients get healthy and fit the doctors in Czechia make sure that they perform procedures with high success rates. The good quality doctors in Czechia are definitely world renowned for their immense contribution to the medical field. The efficiency and thorough approach of the doctors that treat patients in Czechia hospitals covers the entire process from the consultation to the post operative care.

When traveling to Czechia for medical treatment, what essential documents do I need to carry along?

Here are the documents that are a must if you are traveling to Czechia as a medical tourist:

  1. Passport
  2. Visa for Medical Purposes
  3. Confirmed return/onward ticket
  4. Hotel reservation/Accommodation reservation
  5. Financial means proof like bank statement
  6. Medical fees payment receipt
  7. Medical Report from your doctor/hospital in your country of residence
  8. Medical attestation from your doctor or hospital describing your treatment plan

When going to Czechia for your medical treatment, you will carry two kinds of documents and they are related to your treatment and travel. In addition to this, you must be adequately financed for your treatment journey either through self financing or through sponsorship, insurance and do carry the related documents. It is wise for you to be well prepared with your travel and medical documents during your medical travel to Czechia that align with your itinerary and your medical history. Your medical travel to Czechia should be easy and effortless if all your important travel and medical documents are in order.

What are the popular procedures available in Czechia?

Here are the many popular procedures that are commonly performed in Czechia:

  1. Sleeve gastrectomy
  2. Gastric bypass
  3. Knee replacement
  4. Hip replacement
  5. Microdiscectomy
  6. Spinal Fusion

The trend of losing weight surgically is drawing a lot of medical travellers to Czechia as well with procedures such as Sleeve Gastrectomy and Gastric Bypass becoming more popular each year. Orthopaedics is a well developed medical specialty in Czechia and includes both medical management and surgical management of disease and injury. Therefore, procedures like Knee replacement and Hip replacement are really popular in hospitals in Czechia. Among the popular procedures being performed in Czechia, Microdiscectomy and Spinal Fusion are a sign of the strong spinal surgery base in the hospitals in the country.

Is it mandatory to take vaccinations before going to Czechia?

When you are near your departure date to Czechia, please take your vaccinations as it is essential to be protected from potential health hazards before you begin your medical travel. Here are the vaccinations that are a must for any medical traveller who is headed to Czechia for their treatment:

  1. Chickenpox (Varicella)
  2. Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis
  3. Flu (influenza)
  4. Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR)
  5. Polio
  6. Hepatitis A
  7. Hepatitis B
  8. Measles
  9. Covid19

Among the vaccinations that are to be taken before your Czechia medical trip are those that are routine and those basis age specifics and potential health hazards. You can recheck the required vaccinations before your travel to Czechia with the World Health Organisation, a United Nations arm and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a US agency.

What are the other facilities provided by hospitals in Czechia?

There are various add on facilities that are provided by the hospitals in Czechia in lieu of making your stay for your medical treatment comfortable and some of them are listed here:

  1. Insurance assistance
  2. Visa Assistance
  3. Local travel and transfers
  4. Interpreters
  5. Telephonic and email consultations
  6. Accommodation related assistance

The healthcare and administration professionals who are at the forefront of international patient care management in the major hospitals in Czechia provide you the best in international patient care facilities. When you come to get your medical treatment for your condition in any major hospital in Czechia, you will need to liaison with only a single point of contact who will ensure that your international, local travel and hospital transfer is made seamless. This is a great facility that is available for all medical travelers to Czechia. The additional facilities for medical travelers coming to hospitals in Czechia include physiotherapists, pharmacies and laboratory services.