Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) cost in Switzerland

Angiography, which may also be known as arteriography or angiogram, is a technique performed to view the inside of blood vessels, arteries, and veins via the use of images X-ray images. The procedure is normally performed to see the blood flow through the heart, brain, lungs, arms and legs. It is done to evaluate if there is a defect with the blood, to find a source of bleeding, and to check for any blood flow changes. The test can be done by a surgeon, radiologist or cardiologist.

Angiography in Switzerland

Switzerland is extensively recognised for its stunning nature, but it’s the country’s rising medical tourism industry that has been creating headlines lately. The Swiss health system is world-renowned; people from worldwide are opting this destination for many medical treatments and diagnostic tests like angiography. The country has a number of best hospitals in the world with a good number of JCI and ISO-certified centres. These certifications are geared toward increasing patient safety and the superiority of healthcare in the international community. It is the current infrastructure, equipment, medical training and doctors.

Cost Comparison

Even though the costs for procedures like angiography are relatively higher when compared to neighbouring countries like Austria and Germany, people are still travelling to Switzerland to search and get a wide range of procedures. The country has a robust strategic advantage over its local competitors in medical tourism due to its current infrastructure and training of professionals.

Treatment and Cost

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About the Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast)

Most physicians advise their patients to undergo the angiogram procedure (also known as angiography and arteriogram) when certain symptoms such as a heart attack or chest pain become a source of worry. A stress test is performed on patients who report chest pain, which is then followed by an angiogram test.

Angiography procedure aims at testing the blockages in the coronary arteries apart from any other cardiovascular-related ailments. Angiography and angiogram procedure can both locate narrowing arteries or blockages that may exist in different parts of the body.

Angiography is recommended for patients with coronary heart diseases (CHD), which can cause the heartbeat to stop suddenly and abruptly. The patient may also suffer from severe chest pain. Angiography can also be performed on patients on an emergency basis when they experience a heart attack. If the blockage is not treated immediately, then healthy tissues around the heart start perishing and turn into scar tissue. It can give rise to several long-lasting problems. Angiography may also be required in the case of a patient with aortic stenosis or those who have had an abnormal heart stress test.

How is Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) performed?

The procedure involves administering a sedative for relaxation. An intravenous line is inserted into the vein. This is just a precautionary step to ensure that medication can be provided or blood products can be given in case of unwanted complications that take place during the angiography procedure.

  • An antiseptic agent is used to clean the location and a local anesthetic is then administered. For the passage of the needle, a small incision is made. Something named as a stylet, which is a needle with a solid inner core, is inserted into the artery via the incision. After the puncture of the artery, the radiologist replaces the stylet with a guide wire, which is a long wire. Spurting of blood is normal during the process. Through the outer needle, the guide wire is fed into the artery that is supposed to be studied. To direct the guide wire to the correct location of the artery, a fluoroscope display is used. Once the location is spotted, the needle is removed and a catheter is placed over the guide wire’s length until it reaches the region of the study. The guide wire is then removed and now a contrast medium is injected in the region.
  • The contrast medium can be injected either through a syringe or an automatic injector referred to as power injector. Before this, a small test injection is given to check that the catheter is in the right position. The patient is informed to stay as still as possible during this process. The injection can cause a little bit of dizziness, warmth, burning sensation, chest pain, irregular heartbeat, or a headache. The patient is often asked to change position to allow the study from different perspectives.
  • Throughout the procedure, radiographs or fluoroscopic images are obtained in rapid succession. Because of the high pressure of the blood flow in the artery, the contrasting medium gets diluted and starts dissipating in the body. More than one automatic film changers is employed to capture the images.
  • Digital image capture makes it possible to manipulate the information electronically. This is known as digital subtraction angiography or DSA. Computers make use of pixels to analyze the information better. After the completion of the X-Ray, the catheter is slowly removed and manual pressure is applied to the site for about 10 to 20 minutes with a sandbag. This allows resealing of the arterial puncture. A pressure bandage is then applied at this site.

Recovery from Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast)

The patient is kept under close observation for at least 6 to 12 hours if the procedure is performed on an outpatient basis. In case of a femoral artery puncture, the leg is almost kept immobile during the observation period.

Blood pressure and other vital signs are continuously monitored. A cold pack is applied to reduce swelling in the area of puncture and medications are given in case of extreme discomfort.

Hematoma may develop in a few patients. This indicates continuous bleeding from the puncture site and has to be watched for. Two to three days of complete rest is advised and driving should be avoided in the case of patients who have had fluorescein angiography. Direct exposure to sunlight should be avoided for at least 12 hours.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What are the factors affecting the cost of Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Switzerland?

Different hospitals have different pricing policy when it comes to the cost of Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Switzerland. The Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) package cost usually includes all the expenses related to pre and post surgery expenses of the patient. The Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) cost in Switzerland includes the cost of anesthesia, medicines, hospitalization and the surgeon's fee. Post-surgical complications, new findings and delayed recovery may have an impact on the total Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) cost in Switzerland.

Which are some of the best hospitals in Switzerland for Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast)t?

Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Switzerland is offered by multiple hospitals across the country. The top hospitals for Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Switzerland include the following:

  1. Paracelsus Clinic
  2. Universitatsspital Basel
How many days does it take to recover post Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Switzerland?

After Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Switzerland, the patient is supposed to stay in guest house for another 3 days. During this time, the patient undergoes medical tests and consultations. this is to ensure that the treatment was successful and the patient us safe to return.

Which are some of the other popular destinations for Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast)?

Switzerland is one of the most popular countries for Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in the world. The country offers the best cost of Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast), best doctors, and advanced hospital infrastructure. However, there are other countries as mentioned below that are popular for Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) as well:

CountryCost
IndiaUSD 350
IsraelUSD 2000
MalaysiaUSD 2000
PolandUSD 1500
Saudi ArabiaUSD 8500
SingaporeUSD 4400
ThailandUSD 1800
TunisiaUSD 1800
TurkeyUSD 1000
United Arab EmiratesUSD 2750
How much are the other expenses in Switzerland apart from the cost of Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast)?

Apart from the Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) cost, the patient may have to pay for additional daily expenses such as for guest house after discharge and meals. The extra charges may start from USD 50 per person.

Which are the best cities in Switzerland for Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) Procedure?

Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Switzerland is offered in almost all metropolitan cities, including the following:

  1. Geneva
  2. Lustmuhle
  3. Basel
How many days does one have to spend in the hospital for Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Switzerland?

The average duration of stay at the hospital after Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) is about 1 days for proper care and monitoring. The patient is subjected to several biochemistry and radiological scans to see that everything is okay and the recovery is on track. After making sure that patient is clinically stable, discharge is planned.

How many hospitals offer Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Switzerland?

There are more than 2 hospitals that offer Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) in Switzerland. These clinics have propoer infrastructure as well as offer good quality of services when it comes to Angiography (Including Non-Ionic Contrast) Additionally, these hospitals are known to comply with the international standards as well as local legal requirements for the treatment of patients.

FAQ's Related to Switzerland

Which are the popular multispecialty hospital groups in Switzerland?

Switzerland has some world-class multispecialty hospitals, including:

  1. Paracelsus Clinic, Lustmuhle;
  2. Geneva Women Care, Geneva;
  3. Universitatsspital Basel, Basel;
  4. Klinik Hirslanden Zürich, Zurich;
  5. Lindenhofspital Bern, Bern;
  6. Hirslanden Klinik Aarau, Aarau

The country has more than 500 hospitals and boasts of some of the biggest private hospitals in the world. Around 12 hospitals are accredited and they adhere to international standards. The hospitals provide up to 70 percent of all out-patient services in a location. The growing number of hospitals has helped in developing the center of competence for outpatient diagnostic and therapy. Equipped with modern equipment and the latest medical technologies, the multispecialty hospitals in Switzerland are backed by the modern infrastructure to provide world-class treatment.

What healthcare accreditation standards are followed in Switzerland?

In Switzerland, healthcare providers are obliged by law to sign contracts on quality of care based on international standards. International Standards Organization serves as a model of healthcare standards in Switzerland. Standard EN 45001 acts as a benchmark for the accreditation of healthcare providers. The quality of test results is decided after the assessment of the accepted values and requirements. Healthcare standards act as a quality framework to effectively evaluate, control, and improve the standards of quality healthcare.

Why should I opt for healthcare in Switzerland?

Switzerland is one of the most popular medical tourism destinations in the world because of several reasons like its highly qualified trained staff, traditional values of quality, and research-focus. Backed with state-of-art infrastructure and exceptional research institutes, Switzerland offers quality medical care of international standards. The other reasons why Switzerland has become a hot spot for medical tourism are world-class treatment, high level of privacy, and a wide range of treatment specialties.

Do hospitals in Switzerland accept health insurance?

Yes, the hospitals in Switzerland do accept Health Insurance. You should check the procedures or the treatment options that your chosen health insurance does not cover as well. The hospital will request the Guarantee of Payment from the insurance to start your treatment cashless if it is an approved insurance provider. You should know that the expense of many treatments and processes are not covered by insurance plans, such as cosmetic surgery, pregnancy and abortion, and diagnostic tests. If a treatment is not covered under a health insurance plan in Switzerland, you can initially pay for the treatment and apply for reimbursement after you are back in your country.

What are the popular procedures available in Switzerland?

Some of the popular procedures available in Switzerland are:

  1. Cosmetic surgery
  2. IVF treatment
  3. Neurosurgery
  4. Obesity surgery
  5. Orthopaedic surgery

These procedures are performed with high precision and accuracy at high-standard clinics and hospitals backed by advanced technology, and well-trained doctors. Switzerland has gained immense popularity for its excellence in cosmetic surgery and presence of medical health spas which have also made it a preferred spot for medical tourists. IVF is performed with great perfection and safety under the supervision of highly trained fertility experts who are regarded ‘artists’ due to their deep skills in fertility treatment and personalized care.

Which are the most popular cities in Switzerland for medical treatment?

Switzerland has a number of modern urban centers, such as Zurich, Lucerne, Bern, Basel, Geneva, Lausanne, Lugano. Backed by world-class hospitals with highly professional and talented hospitals and modern infrastructure, Switzerland delivers unmatched treatment. Zurich and Geneva are the most popular destinations for medical tourism in Switzerland as these cities have an amazing public transportation system, a number of cheap hotels, and connectivity through airlines. These cities are most preferred by medical tourists because of many other reasons like a large number of hospitals, rich culture, scenic value, availability of translators, and safety of tourists.

Is it mandatory to take vaccinations before going to Switzerland?

Vaccination is highly recommended or required for Switzerland. WHO and CDC recommend the following vaccines

  1. Hepatitis A
  2. Hepatitis B
  3. Rabies
  4. Meningitis
  5. Polio
  6. Measles
  7. Mumps and rubella (MMR)
  8. Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis)
  9. Chickenpox
  10. Shingles
  11. Pneumonia
  12. Influenza.

Always have MMR and other routine vaccinations because some regions of Switzerland have periodic disease outbreaks. Vaccines and their dosage vary as per the traveler's age, immunization history, and current medical conditions. Before a trip to Switzerland, you can get pre-exposure vaccination against rabies and yellow fever.

What is the process for obtaining medical visa in Switzerland?

Schengen Visa allows a person to travel to Switzerland to seek medical treatment. You are allowed to stay for a maximum of 90 days in Switzerland if you hold this visa. In case you have to stay for more than 90 days, you need to apply for a National Visa for Medical Treatment. Here is a list of documents that you will require for applying for a medical visa:

  1. Full return flight reservation
  2. Proof of stay in Switzerland
  3. Signed official medical letter from medical institution
  4. Signed medical letter from a recognized local practitioner
  5. Passport
  6. Passport-sized photographs
  7. Online Application form