Brachial Plexus Injuries/Stereotactic Procedure Cost

Brachial plexus is a mesh of nerves that link the spinal cord and the nerves present in the arm. Injury to the brachial plexus can range from minor to severe. A minor damage will not require surgery, but it should not be ignored. The right candidate for surgery has a severe nerve injury termed as avulsion, rupture or laceration. Avulsions are the most severe form brachial plexus injury, in this, the nerve root gets disconnected leading to a partially or fully paralyzed arm.

Symptoms of the brachial plexus injury depend on the extent of the damage to each nerve. Avulsions, ruptures, lacerations cause weakness, paralysis, numbness or pain in the shoulder, arm hand or finger.

Cost Comparison

A nerve transfer is helpful in cases of a severely damaged nerve. In this procedure, a healthy nerve is taken from its original method and inserted into a different location. At this location, the nerve supply is damaged. The connection established between the healthy nerve and spine remains intact, and the transferred nerve brings the motor and sensory abilities to the lost area.

The other procedure used is nerve grafting, which is necessary for bridging the gap between the two cut ends of the nerve. It is useful in restoring the movement or sensation.

Treatment and Cost

10

Total Days
In Country

2 No. Travelers

3 Day in Hospital

7 Days Outside Hospital

Treatment cost starts from

USD 5500

Hospitals

About the Brachial Plexus Injuries/Stereotactic Procedures

Brachial plexus injury is a medical emergency caused due to an injury to the brachial plexus group of nerves that sends signals from your spine to your shoulder, arm, and hand. These nerves control and administer feelings in the muscles of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, and arm. This damage is also known as brachial plexopathy. Brachial plexus injury appears when these nerves are compressed, stretched, or in the most serious case, ripped apart from the spinal cord. Some brachial plexus injuries known as stingers or burners are inconsequential and will completely recover in a few weeks. However, other brachial plexus injuries are severe enough and may cause some permanent impairment in the arm. In severe conditions, it can paralyze your arm, with a failure of function and sensation.


Brachial Plexus Injury Causes

Brachial plexus injury results when the brachial nerves are damaged by excessive stretching, pressure, or cutting. Stretching can occur when your shoulder is forced down while your neck stretches up and away from the injured shoulder such as during a motorcycle or a car accident. In case of a serious injury, the brachial nerve may rip off the spinal cord in the neck. This type of brachial plexus injury is classified as traumatic brachial plexus injuries. It may occur because of different reasons, including:

  • Contact sports: Contact sports players may experience burners or stingers, which can occur when the nerves in the brachial plexus get stretched above their limits during collisions with other players.
  • Trauma: Several types of trauma, including motorcycle and car accidents or bullet wounds, can result in a brachial plexus injury.
  • Inflammation: Inflammation may also cause damage to the brachial plexus. An uncommon condition known as Parsonage-Turner syndrome or brachial plexitis causes brachial plexus inflammation without any trauma.
  • Tumors: Noncancerous (benign) or cancerous tumors may damage the brachial plexus.
  • Childbirth: Injury during complication of childbirth.

Brachial plexopathy may also result from exposure to radiation at the time of stereotactic radiosurgery or specific procedures such as stereotactic breast biopsy.


Brachial Plexus Injury Symptoms

Symptoms of the brachial plexus injury depend on the seriousness of the injury. A minor injury can often occur during any contact sport and minor trauma when the brachial plexus nerves get stretched or compressed. Minor brachial plexus injury symptoms include the following:

  • Burning sensation and shocks shooting down your arm
  • Weakness and numbness in your arm

More serious brachial plexus injury symptoms result when nerves are torn or ruptured. Such injuries may produce the following symptoms:

  • Weakness or inability to use certain muscles of hand, arm or shoulder
  • Complete lack of movement and feelings (paralysis) in your arm, including your shoulder and hand
  • Severe pain

In case of childbirth brachial plexus injury, symptoms can be seen right after the birth of the child. These may include:

  • No movement in the upper or lower arm or hand of the baby
  • Arm flexed (bent) at the elbow and held against the body
  • Absence of Moro reflex on the affected side
  • Decreased grip on the affected side

How is Brachial Plexus Injuries/Stereotactic Procedures performed?

Some common types of surgical brachial plexus injury treatment include the following:

  • Nerve grafting: Surgically removing and replacing the damaged part of the brachial plexus with sections of nerves harvested from other parts of the body is called nerve grafting. 
  • Nerve transfer: This type of surgery is opted when the nerve root has been torn from the spinal cord. A surgeon often takes a less important nerve that is still attached to the spinal cord and connects it to the nerve that is ripped off from the spinal cord. Occasionally, a combination of nerve graft and nerve transfer is performed.
  • Muscle transfer: During this surgery, your surgeon removes a less important muscle or ligament from another part of your body and transfers it to your arm, and restores the nerves and blood vessels supplying that muscle.

Recovery from Brachial Plexus Injuries/Stereotactic Procedures

It is very hard to assess an exact recovery time after brachial plexus injury treatment due to the broad spectrum. How likely a spontaneous recovery depends on the type and severity of the injury.

In the case of surgery, nerve tissue grows very slowly, about an inch a month, so it can take a few years to assess the success of brachial plexus injury surgery. However, during the recovery period, patients are encouraged to keep their joints flexible by following an exercise schedule. The success rate of surgery is quite good but recovery time and success rate must be assessed on an individual basis.

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