Oral cancer Treatment

U.A.E.
n/a
India
$3200
Thailand
$6000
Turkey
$16985
Singapore
$30000
  • travellers

    2 No. Of Travellers

  • hospital

    5 Day In Hospital

  • outdie-hospital

    20 Day Outside Hospital

  • travel

    25 Total Days In India

Overview

Oral cancer, commonly referred to as mouth cancer or throat cancer, is an uncontrollable growth of cells in the oral cavity. It refers to cancer that develops in any of the parts that make up the mouth. It can include cancer of the lips, tongue, cheeks, the floor of the mouth, pharynx (throat), hard and soft palate and either of the sinuses. Mouth and oropharyngeal cancer can be life-threatening, but it could be prevented if the cancer is diagnosed early enough.

What Causes Oral Cancer?

Oral cancer is a result of a mutation in the DNA of the cells in the mouth. There are certain identified risk factors for mouth cancer that predisposes a person to oral cancer.

Some of the oral cancer risk factors include:

  • Smoking: Smoking tobacco (cigarettes, cigars, and pipes) contains nitrosamines and other chemicals that are known to cause cancer. People who are exposed to passive smoking also experience a small increase in their risk of oral cancer.  
  • Chewing tobacco: Use of any type of tobacco is one of the main reasons behind oral cancer. Chewing tobacco is not a safe alternative to cigarettes. It is a popular habit in parts of Asia and in some immigrant groups in Europe, North America, and Australia. The harmful substances in tobacco and betel can cause oral cancer.
  • Alcohol consumption: Drinking excessive alcohol increases the risk of oral cancer. Using tobacco and alcohol both pose a much greater risk than using either of the substance alone.
  • Poor diet: Lack of vitamins and minerals, such as iron or folic acid in the diet, can lead to a breakdown in the oral mucosa and this can make people more prone to oral cancer. People should eat plenty of proteins, vitamins, and minerals to decrease the risk of oral cancer. Fresh fruits and vegetables contain a lot of antioxidants, vitamins and other substances that help prevent damage to body cells.
  • A family history of disease: There is a slightly higher risk of getting oral cancer in people who have a close relative who once had oral cancer.
  • Human Papilloma Virus (HPV): HPV can contribute to some types of cancers, but it does not mean that people get these cancers like an infection. HPV can be passed on to another individual during a sexual contact, but for a majority of people, the virus is harmless and does not cause any trouble. Only a very small percentage of people with HPV end up developing oral cancer.

Oral Cancer Symptoms

There are some typical signs of mouth cancer that a majority of patients experience. Make sure to visit your doctor or dentist in case you experience any of the following signs of mouth cancer:

  • Pain and discomfort in the mouth: Ongoing pain or discomfort from a long time in the mouth is the one of the most symptoms.
  • Ulcers and sore: Bleeding ulcer or sore, which is not healing for more than two weeks can be a symptom of oral cancer.
  • Unexplained bleeding: Unexplained bleeding in the mouth can be an alarming indication of oral cancer.
  • Numbness and lost sensation: Numbness, loss of feeling or tenderness in any area of the mouth, or neck can be a symptom.
  • White or red patches: Any abnormal looking patches in the mouth or throat could be a sign of cancer or precancerous changes. Although, a fungal infection called thrush can also be the reason for white or red patches.
  • Difficulty in swallowing: You may feel difficulty in chewing and swallowing and feel like your food is sticking in your throat. Feeling difficulty in speaking or moving the jaw and tongue can be one of the most important throat cancer symptoms.
  • Weight loss: Dramatic weight loss without any reason can also be a symptom.

Explore Best Hospital for Oral cancer Treatment

Find out more

Before the Treatment

Before initiating treatment, it is important to identify mouth or throat cancer symptoms and diagnose the condition.

Oral Cancer Diagnosis

Early diagnosis of oral cancer is one of the keys to improved rates of survival. It is better to visit a dentist periodically so that as a part of your routine dental exam, your dentist can conduct an oral cancer screening exam if he or she sees any lumps or irregular tissue changes in your neck, head, face, and oral cavity.

The following are some of the common tests used for oral cancer diagnosis:

  • Cancer screening: Screening includes a series of tests to check for early signs of cancer. But it must be effective, accurate, and should not give false positive results in people who do not have cancer.
  • Physical examination: Physical examination of your lips and mouth to look for abnormalities and areas of irritation, such as sores and white patches by the specialist is a part of an oral cancer diagnosis.
  • Oral brush biopsy: If your doctor or dentist finds a suspicious area in your mouth, they may remove a sample of cells from the suspected location and send it for laboratory testing. This procedure is known as a biopsy.

At this stage, you may want to ask several questions from your doctor about the future course of action. Do not stop yourself from clearing your doubts from the surgeon and prepare your mind accordingly. You may want to know more about the impact of surgery on your quality of life and how soon you are expected to recover from the surgery.

You must make several lifestyle-related chances prior to treatment to improve your chances of successful recovery. Additionally, stop taking specific medicines or drugs prior to the treatment or as advised by the doctor.

How it is Performed

Oral cancer treatment is similar to that for other types of cancers. You may have to go for just one type of treatment or a combination of different cancer treatment options. Your doctor will suggest you the most suitable treatment depending on the location of cancer, its stage, and your overall health status.

Some of the common treatment options for oral cancer include:

  • Surgery: It is one of the primary treatment options for mouth cancer. Your specialist may cut away the tumor and a margin of the healthy tissue that surrounds it to ensure all of the cancer cells have been removed. In some cases, the patient may have to undergo a neck dissection surgery, if the cancer cells have spread to the lymph nodes. Depending on the exact location of cancer in the oral cavity, the following surgeries may be performed:
  1. Mandibular resection surgery (partial or full thickness)
  2. Maxillectomy (full or partial)
  3. Mohs' surgery for lips
  4. Glossectomy (partial or total)
  5. Laryngectomy
  • Radiation therapy: In radiation therapy, a high-energy beam, such as X-rays and protons, are used to kill cancer cells. It comes with some side effects.
  • Chemotherapy: It is a drug treatment used to kill cancer cells. Chemotherapy drugs can be given alone or in combination with other cancer treatment. Chemotherapy is best suitable in cases where cancer has spread to other locations as well.
  • Alternative medicine: This treatment may help cope with oral cancer and the side effects of cancer treatment, but it cannot be used to treat oral cancer alone.

Recovery

A majority of patients who undergo oral cancer treatment are able to recover quickly. It is estimated that more than 80 percent of the patients survive after timely treatment and if the cancer is diagnosed in its early stage. You may expect doctors to ask you to visit their clinic regularly even after your treatment. Your progress will be closely monitored and accordingly, the doctor will decide if any follow up procedure is required.

Recovery after oral cancer treatment depends on what type of procedures you were subjected to. If you’ve had a surgery, you are most likely to have a drip in your arm that feeds you fluids until you are able to eat by yourself. Additionally, you are likely to have a wound drain and a catheter in place to collect and measure urine. If you’ve had a tracheotomy, you will have a breathing tube in your neck.

Talking after the surgery is often challenging after the treatment for oral cancer. This may sometimes prove frustrating. Therefore, it is important to have someone nearby to take care of things for you and understand what you may need to communicate. It is normal to experience pain for a few days after the surgery. You may be administered painkillers after the surgery through an epidural.

The stitches are usually removed after 10 days of the surgery. The drain tube is removed three to seven days after the procedure. You will be given a detailed plan by a dietician, which outlines the things you should drink and eat after the removal of the feeding tube. You may be put on a liquid or soft diet for several days initially.

Get treatment cost for Oral cancer Treatment & travel

Click Here

FAQ

Q: Can oral cancer reoccur?

A: Although chances are rare, oral cancer patients can still develop cancer in the lungs, larynx, esophagus, pancreas or any other organ after treatment, However, this will only happen if cancer cells are left off.

Q: What is the gum cancer survival rate?

A: The 5-year gun cancer survival rate is around 83 percent for cancer that is restricted to its place of origin, 62 percent for cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes, and around 38 percent for cancer that has metastasized to the distant tissues and organs.

Q: What is the stage 4 oral cancer survival rate?

A: Stage 4 oral cancer survival rate is around 38 percent.

Q: What does cancer of the lip look like?

A: A red or white patch on the lip, a sore, lesion, lump, or blister on the lip, or bleeding or pain on the lips are some of the common signs of cancer of the lip.

Videos

About Procedure

Please Enquire

Oral cancer Treatment

Are you struggling to find what you are looking for?

Get in touch with our medical representative to get the assistance

medigence-quality